PDF in Oftalmologia in italiano/inglese (articoli presenti: 1074)

Strategies for improving the early diagnosis of keratoconus

Abstract: To diagnose keratoconus at its earliest stage is meaningful in order to avoid refractive surgery in the eye, which may lead to further damage in the abnormal cornea structure and consequently cause iatrogenic ectasia. 


In this article, the following aspects of detecting earliest stage of keratoconus were reviewed: 1) nomenclature of the earliest forms of keratoconus; 2) diagnosis of keratoconus using curvature-based topography (also known as Placido-based topography, ie, videokeratography) as a traditional method and elevationbased topography as a new method which has gained popularity in recent years; and 3) other methods analyzing keratoconus cornea like corneal biomechanics and wavefront sensing. 

Elevation-based topography using either Scheimpflug imaging techniques or slit-scanning imaging techniques has shown to be advantageous over the curvature-based topography in detecting keratoconus at its earliest stage. Posterior elevation of the cornea is notified to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of detection if used along with the measurements of anterior surface of the cornea.
 
Cornea biomechanics analysis and wavefront sensing also revealed differences between normal eyes and keratoconic eyes in their earliest stage. Combining the latest technology and the traditional techniques will be the future trend to improve early diagnosis of keratoconus.

Keywords: keratoconus, early diagnosis, Scheimpflug imaging, slit-scanning imaging, wavefront error, corneal biomechanics.


Strategies for improving the early diagnosis of keratoconus


Area Tematica : cornea

Epithelial, Stromal, and Total Corneal Thickness in Keratoconus: Three-Dimensional Display with Artemis Very-High Frequency Digital Ultrasound

ABSTRACT 


PURPOSE: To characterize the epithelial, stromal, and total corneal thickness profi le in a population of eyes with keratoconus. METHODS: Epithelial, stromal, and total corneal thickness profi les were measured in vivo by Artemis very high-frequency (VHF) digital ultrasound scanning (ArcScan, Morrison, Colo) across the central 6- to 10-mm diameter of the cornea on 54 keratoconic eyes. Maps of the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, and range of epithelial, stromal, and total corneal thickness were plotted. The average location of the thinnest epithelium, stroma, and total cornea were found. The cross-sectional semi-meridional stromal and total corneal thickness profi les were calculated using annular averaging. The absolute stromal and total corneal thickness progressions relative to the thinnest point were calculated using annular averaging as well as for 8 semi-meridians individually. 

RESULTS: The mean corneal vertex epithelial, stromal, and total corneal thicknesses were 45.75.9 µm, 426.438.5 µm, and 472.241.4 µm, respectively. The average epithelial thickness profi le showed an epithelial doughnut pattern characterized by localized central thinning surrounded by an annulus of thick epithelium. The thinnest epithelium, stroma, and total cornea were displaced on average by 0.480.66 mm temporally and 0.320.67 mm inferiorly, 0.310.45 mm temporally and 0.540.37 mm inferiorly, and 0.310.43 mm temporally and 0.500.35 mm inferiorly, respectively, with reference to the corneal vertex. The increase in semi-meridional absolute stromal and total corneal thickness progressions was greatest inferiorly and lowest temporally. 

CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional thickness mapping of the epithelial, stromal, and total corneal thickness profi les characterized thickness changes associated with keratoconus and may help in early diagnosis of keratoconus. [J Refract Surg. 2009;xx:xxx-xxx.] DOI:1.9999/1081597X-200905015-06


Epithelial, Stromal, and Total Corneal Thickness in Keratoconus: Three-Dimensional Display with Artemis Very-High Frequency Digital Ultrasound


Area Tematica : cornea

Orbscan 2 Corneal Imaging


Orbscan 2 Corneal Imaging


Area Tematica : cornea

Artemis epithelial thickness mapping helps to detect keratoconus

Stefanie Petrou 


Binder MD EPITHELIAL thickness mapping may enable LASIK to be performed in eyes that get excluded due to topographically suspect keratoconus.A majority of suspect keratoconic eyes by topography in a recent study were confirmed to be non-keratoconic by epithelial thickness mapping, and demonstrated equal stability and refractive outcomes as control eyes, at six to 12 months.


Artemis epithelial thickness mapping helps to detect keratoconus


Area Tematica : cornea

ArcScan Atemis 3


ArcScan Atemis 3


Area Tematica : cornea

1 parte Advanced diagnostic tecnologies in keratoconus andcorneal ectatic disease


1 parte Advanced diagnostic tecnologies in keratoconus andcorneal ectatic disease


Area Tematica : cornea

ARVO Abstracs Annual Meeting 2015


ARVO Abstracs Annual Meeting 2015


Area Tematica : cornea

Repeatability of corneal epithelial thickness measurements using Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in normal and Post-LASIK eyes

Abstract Purpose

To evaluate the repeatability of corneal epithelial thickness (ET) and corneal thickness (CT) measurements in normal and LASIK eyes using the optical coherence tomography (OCT, RTVue).

Methods—In 35 right eyes of 35 normal subjects and 45 right eyes of 45 subjects with prior myopic LASIK, corneal ET and CT were evaluated in 17 areas: 1) one central zone within 0-2.0 mm diameter, 2) eight paracentral zones from 2.0-5.0 mm diameter, and 3) eight peripheral zones from 5.0-6.0 mm diameter. The repeatability was assessed using within-subject standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CoV), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

 Results—At the central and paracentral zones, respectively, the SD values were 0.7 μm and 0.6-0.9 μm in normal eyes and 0.7 μm and 0.8-1.7 μm in LASIK eyes for ET, and 1.0 μm and 2.8-4.6 μm in normal eyes and 1.3 μm and 4.0-4.8 μm in LASIK eyes for CT. At the peripheral zones, in normal and LASIK eyes, respectively, SD values ranged from 0.8-1.2 μm and 1.4-2.2 μm for ET, and 4.1-6.4 μm and 6.0-9.1 μm for CT. The CoV values were low and ICC values were high in both groups for both ET and CT measurements.

Conclusion—The OCT produced excellent repeatability, especially at the central and paracentral zones up to 5-mm diameter for both corneal epithelial thickness and corneal thickness measurements.


Repeatability of corneal epithelial thickness measurements using Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in normal and Post-LASIK eyes


Area Tematica : cornea

The Athens Protocol

P rogressive, asymmetrical corneal steepening associated with an increase in myopic and astigmatic refractive errors, combined with midperipheral and/or peripheral corneal thinning, represents a constellation of findings in ectatic corneal disorders (eg, keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration). 


These entitites are associated with asymmetry upon presentation, unpredictability of progression, and myriad abnormal topographic findings. Similar observations after LASIK surgery have been described as post-LASIK ectasia. 1-3 Analyses of series of eyes that have developed post-LASIK ectasia have suggested that certain preoperative and/or operative features may be associated with this adverse outcome of LASIK or PRK.4 

The fact that ectasia can occur in the absence of these features, or that it may not occur in spite of them, has confounded surgeons’ understanding of this complication.5 Nevertheless, post-LASIK ectasia is a visually disabling complication whose ultimate surgical treatment is penetrating keratoplasty when glasses or contact lenses can no longer provide patients with visual quality that allows them to perform their activities of daily living.

 During the past 10 years, the use of topical riboflavin combined with ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation to increase collagen cross-linking (CXL) has demonstrated the potential for retarding or eliminating the progression of keratoconus and post-LASIK ectasia. My colleagues and I have previously reported on the application of CXL in post-LASIK ectasia.6 We have found that once the progression has stabilized, it is possible to treat the surface of the eye with customized PRK to normalize the corneal surface by reducing irregular astigmatism. 

After using CXL for cases of ectasia, my colleagues and I introduced the Athens Protocol, which consists of same-day, topography-guided partial PRK and CXL.


The Athens Protocol


Area Tematica : cornea

The fundus photo has met its match: optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy are here to stay


The fundus photo has met its match: optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy are here to stay


Area Tematica : patologie maculari

The Diagnostic Accuracy of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Comparison with Fundus Fluorescein Angiography


The Diagnostic Accuracy of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Comparison with Fundus Fluorescein Angiography


Area Tematica : oct

μOCT imaging using depth of focus extension by self-imaging wavefront division in a commonpath fiber optic probe

Abstract: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive medical modality due to its ability to acquire high-resolution, cross-sectional images inside the body using flexible, small-diameter, scanning fiber optic probes. Conventional, cross-sectional OCT imaging technologies have approximately 10-μm axial resolution and 30-μm lateral resolution, specifications that enable the visualization of microscopic architectural morphology. While this resolution is useful for many clinical applications, it is insufficient for resolving individual cells that characterize many diseases. To address this gap, a supercontinuum-laser-based, μm-resolution OCT (μOCT) system and a 500 μm-diameter, extended depth of focus single fiber optic probe for endoscopic and intravascular imaging were designed and fabricated. At the distal tip of the fiber optic probe, a cylindrical waveguide was used to divide the wavefront to provide multiple circular propagation modes. Once transmitted through a relatively high NA lens (NA >0.1), these modes were projected as multiple coaxial foci (~3 μm full width at half maximum (FWHM)) over a greatly extended focal depth range. The distal tip of the probe also contained a common-path reference reflectance to minimize polarization and dispersion imbalances between sample and reference arm light. Measurements showed that the probe provides a 20-fold depth of focus extension, maintaining a 3-5 µm lateral resolution (FWHM of PSF) and a 2 μm axial resolution over a depth range of approximately 1 mm. These results suggest that this new optical configuration will be useful for achieving high-resolution, cross-sectional OCT imaging in catheter/endoscope-based medical imaging devices. ©2016 Optical Society of 


America OCIS codes: (050.1220) Apertures; (070.7345) Wave propagation; (080.2740) Geometric optical design; (120.4640) Optical instruments; (170.2150) Endoscopic imaging; (170.4500) Optical coherence tomography. 


μOCT imaging using depth of focus extension by self-imaging wavefront division in a commonpath fiber optic probe


Area Tematica : oct

Corneal topography in keratoconus: state of the art

Abstract 

The morphological characterization of the cornea using corneal topographers is a widespread clinical practice that is essential for the diagnosis of keratoconus. 

The current state of this non-invasive exploratory technique has evolved with the possibility of achieving a great number of measuring points of both anterior and posterior corneal surfaces, which is possible due to the development of new and advanced measurement devices. All these data are later used to extract a series of topographic valuation indices that permit to offer the most exact and reliable clinical diagnosis. 

This paper describes the technologies in which current corneal topographers are based on, being possible to define the main morphological characteristics that the keratoconus pathology produces on corneal surface. Finally, the main valuation indices, which are provided by the corneal topographers and used for the diagnosis of keratoconus, are also defined.

 Keywords: Placido disc, Detection system, Topographer, Diagnosis


Corneal topography in keratoconus: state of the art


Area Tematica : cornea

Metodo Delphy

 Nel mondo antico l’oracolo di Delphi dispensava i suoi vaticini, ascoltato da chiunque si accingesse ad intraprendere azioni importanti o rischiose, in ogni caso impegnative. L’importanza di tali responsi era considerata tale da portare oltre che alla costruzione di un santuario, anche a far considerare Delphi come “l’ombelico del mondo”.


E' il metodo capostipite per la ricerca sociale partecipata. Si svolge attraverso l’interazione di un gruppo (panel) di individui (esperti, testimoni privilegiati, rappresentanti, cittadini) che interagiscono, argomentano attivamente un problema complesso creando così un processo di comunicazione di gruppo virtuoso.


Metodo Delphy


Area Tematica : cornea

Clinical assessment of a Novel multicolor-spot reflection Topographer with Scheimpflug Tomography and Placido Topography in Normal Eyes


Clinical assessment of a Novel multicolor-spot reflection Topographer with Scheimpflug Tomography and Placido Topography in Normal Eyes


Area Tematica : cornea

Progression Criteria Based on Multiple Imaging Devices


Progression Criteria Based on Multiple Imaging Devices


Area Tematica : cornea

Studying Corneal Epithelium In Vivo: A New Tool in Clinical Practice

Editorial The evaluation of corneal pachymetry has acquired importance in recent years, especially in the preoperative screening of refractive surgery cases. In addition to corneal thickness, studying the distribution of corneal epithelial thickness is becoming a very useful parameter, both clinically and in research settings. Evaluation of the corneal epithelial map can help clinicians in everyday decision-making and to a safer screening for refractive surgery candidates. Topographic irregularities of epithelial pachymetry either localized or diffuse, can significantly affect the overall corneal refractive power. In addition, corneal epithelium in several cases may be masking underlying stromal disorders.


Studying Corneal Epithelium In Vivo: A New Tool in Clinical Practice


Area Tematica : cornea

Eye World febbraio 2016

Based on results of the 2015 ASCRS Clinical Survey, which compiled feedback from more than 2,000 unique respondents, 68% of members do not have patients who receive laser-assisted cataract surgery (LACS) (Figure 1). 


The survey also revealed clinical areas where respondents thinks LACS may provide significant clinical benefits compared with conventional surgery: capsulorhexis, 59%; arcuate refractive incisions, 58%; and lens fragmentation, 45%.

 More than half of respondents were not very confident or not at all confident that there is an adequate reimbursement solution (private pay and/or insurance) to support LACS. This seems to be a limiting step for many surgeons.

When questioned about barriers to adoption, more than 70% reported that LACS is not a viable economic model for their practices. Our panel of experts will help surgeons dismantle the barriers that stand between them and LACS and share recommendations for implementing LACS.

 They treat patients from different economic environments throughout the country and are successful with LACS. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to improve patients’ quality of vision. 

Dr. Donnenfeld practices with Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island and Connecticut and is a clinical professor of ophthalmology, New York University, and trustee, Dartmouth Medical School.


Eye World febbraio 2016


Area Tematica : cornea

EYE Word aprile 2016

Although the prevalence of dry eye has been reported to range from 8–34%, it tends to be under recognized and under diagnosed (Figure 1).1,2 Ocular surface health is critically important to vision quality—particularly after cataract and refractive surgery. 


Historically, dry eye disease (DED) and ocular surface disease (OSD) were not mainstream topics because our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease process was limited, as were our diagnostic and treatment modalities. 

We hope our new paradigm of point-of-care testing will drive awareness of the importance of DED and OSD and how they relate to the presurgical patient.

Moreover, we hope these assessments will help us diagnose this condition even before symptoms develop. Effects of OSD Because the tear film is the first refractive surface that light encounters, an unstable tear film reduces vision quality and adversely affects preop testing and postop vision quality.

Epitropoulos et al. showed significant variation in average K readings and resulting IOL power calculations in patients with elevated tear osmolarity.


EYE Word aprile 2016


Area Tematica : cornea

Eye Word marzo 2016

Twenty percent of ASCRS members who perform laser vision correction (LVC) do not have a standardized method to assess successful outcomes, according to results of the 2015 ASCRS Clinical Survey (Figure 1). When assessing successful outcomes, 43% consider patient satisfaction and 65% consider a visual acuity of 20/20 or better a successful outcome. In today’s clinical environment, however, 20/20 vision is only part of the equation. Patients have higher expectations that have to be met for them to feel satisfied with their outcome. 


Eye Word marzo 2016


Area Tematica : cornea

A NOVEL METHOD OF OBJECTIVE TESTING IN DED

Epidemiologic studies estimate that the prevalence of dry eye disease (DED) is as much as 25% in the general population.1,2 Significantly associated with aging, DED occurs most frequently in those over the age of 45 years.3 It is more prevalent in women compared with men.4-6 Contributing factors to DED may be classified as ocular, medical, pharmaceutical, iatrogenic, environmental, and contact–lens-related.


A NOVEL METHOD OF OBJECTIVE TESTING IN DED


Area Tematica : cornea

Novel Keratoconus Diagnosis and Progression Criteria Based on Multiple Anterior Segment Imaging Devices


Novel Keratoconus Diagnosis and Progression Criteria Based on Multiple Anterior Segment Imaging Devices


Area Tematica : cornea

Tear Meniscus Analysis with Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Keratoconus


Tear Meniscus Analysis with Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Keratoconus


Area Tematica : cornea

Comparison of Macular Thickness in Patients with Keratoconus and Control Subjects Using the Cirrus HD-OCT


Comparison of Macular Thickness in Patients with Keratoconus and Control Subjects Using the Cirrus HD-OCT


Area Tematica : cornea

Keratoconus Diagnosis with An Optical Coherence Tomography- Based Pachymetric Scoring System


Keratoconus Diagnosis with An Optical Coherence Tomography- Based Pachymetric Scoring System


Area Tematica : cornea

Comparison of Corneal Epithelial Thickness Measurement Between Fourier-Domain OCT and Very High-Frequency Digital Ultrasound


Comparison of Corneal Epithelial Thickness Measurement Between Fourier-Domain OCT and Very High-Frequency Digital Ultrasound


Area Tematica : cornea

Assessing progression of keratoconus: novel tomographic determinant


Assessing progression of keratoconus: novel tomographic determinant


Area Tematica : cornea

Evaluation of scleral and corneal thickness in keratoconus patients

Abstract Purpose:


To identify corneal epithelial- and stromal-thickness distribution patterns in keratoconus using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT).

Patients and Methods: We analyzed SD-OCT findings in 20 confirmed cases of keratoconus (group 1) and in 20 healthy subjects with corneal astigmatism $2 D (group 2). Epithelial and stromal thicknesses were measured at 11 strategic locations along the steepest and flattest meridians, previously located by corneal topography. Vertical mirrored symmetry superimposition was used in the statistical analysis. 

Results: The mean maximum keratometry measurements in groups 1 and 2 were 47.962.9 D (range, 41.8–52.8) and 45.661.1 D (range, 42.3–47.5), respectively, with mean corneal cylinders of 3.362.2 D (range, 0.5–9.5) and 3.661.2 D (range, 2.0–6.4), respectively. The mean epithelial thickness along the steepest meridian in group 1 was the lowest (37.464.4 mm) at 1.2 mm inferotemporally and the highest (59.364.4 mm) at 1.4 mm supranasally from the corneal vertex. There was only a small deviation in thickness along the steepest meridian in group 2, as well as along the flattest meridians in both groups. The stromal thickness distribution in the two groups was similar to the epithelial, while the stromal thickness was generally lower in group 1 than in group 2.

Conclusions: SD-OCT provides details about the distribution of corneal epithelial and stromal thicknesses. The epithelium and stroma in keratoconic eyes were thinner inferotemporally and thicker supranasally compared with control eyes. The distribution pattern was more distinct in epithelium than in stroma. This finding may help improve the early diagnosis of keratoconus.


Evaluation of scleral and corneal thickness in keratoconus patients


Area Tematica : cornea

Spectral-Domain OCT Analysis of Regional Epithelial Thickness Profiles in Keratoconus, Postoperative Corneal Ectasia, and Normal Eyes


Spectral-Domain OCT Analysis of Regional Epithelial Thickness Profiles in Keratoconus, Postoperative Corneal Ectasia, and Normal Eyes


Area Tematica : cornea

Global Consensus on Keratoconus and Ectatic Diseases


Global Consensus on Keratoconus and Ectatic Diseases


Area Tematica : cornea

Parameters to Document Progression of Keratoconus

The Keratoconus Expert Group, conceived and established by Jérôme C. Vryghem, MD, is a vibrant group of invited international corneal experts with special interest in keratoconus. Prior to the meeting of the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ESCRS) in October 2013, the group, in its fourth year, convened with a specific purpose to arrive at a consensus in three principal areas: 

(1) the criteria used to determine the progression of keratoconus,
 (2) when (and how) to perform corneal collagen crosslinking, 
and (3) the value of intrastromal corneal ring segments. 
I had the privilege and rather challenging job of chairing the section on establishing criteria for measuring the progression of keratoconus. I say challenging because, as you will see from the articles in this bonus feature—particularly those by A. John Kanellopoulos, MD, and Michael Belin, MD—there are considerable differences in opinion on this subject. Although there is general agreement about what should be considered progression, it is clear that more scientific study is required when it comes to measuring subtle progression. There are a number of variables at play, and each one is unique, with its own characteristics. Even data analysis using averages is fraught with problems, unless one has the luxury of access to 100% data in all eyes at all timeframes with similar criteria, including cessation of contact lens wear prior to evaluation. As Dr. Belin points out, most patients with keratoconus are dependent on hard contact lenses, and, as these lenses definitely affect anterior corneal shape, basing decisions mainly on anterior parameters carries risk of potential error. 
Requesting that patients with keratoconus keep their lenses out for 1 month in order to evaluate them properly is idealistic and probably overkill. Often, when there is considerable controversy, simple approaches are best. Dr. Belin’s approach is quite attractive: Corneal thickness and posterior elevation may be the best criteria to use, perhaps with the addition of corneal volumetric change. We may also need an alternative approach altogether, using a different method of diagrammatic presentation; Damien Gatinel, MD, has used a clever method in his Score software (Bausch + Lomb Technolas), which employs multiple variables to evaluate the risk of keratoconus in corneas prior to elective ablative refractive surgery. Getting back to basics, evaluating markers for keratconus is likely the ultimate tool, and Jesús Merayo, MD, PhD, reports on some of his work in this area, which looks interesting and promising. We hope you enjoy these articles, and we expect that you have your own individual opinions. Please do not hesitate to contact us—we would love to have the opportunity to publish your views.


Parameters to Document Progression of Keratoconus


Area Tematica : cornea

Protocollo Malattie Reumatologiche

INTRODUZIONE 

La reumatologia è un ambito complesso ove non sono utili esami di screening. I quadri di presentazione possono essere molteplici all’interno della stessa patologia, alcuni quadri iniziali possono essere comuni a patologie diverse; di conseguenza l’inquadramento nosologico e la diagnosi differenziale sono complessi e richiedono l’utilizzo di esami di laboratorio il cui risultato deve essere interpretato alla luce del sospetto clinico e del quadro sindromico generale. Va tenuto conto che una patologia reumatica evolve nel tempo creando problemi sempre nuovi e diversi sia al paziente che al medico curante e d’altra parte alcune delle patologie reumatiche più comuni come l’osteoartrosi, l’artrite reumatoide, l’artrite psoriasica ed il reumatismo fibromialgico possono essere sospettate senza test di laboratorio. Per contro, richiedere esami di laboratorio dovrebbe essere finalizzato a confermare o escludere una potenziale patologia reumatica ipotizzata alla visita clinica. Premesso ciò, il documento avrebbe l’intento di proporre l’utilizzo di alcuni esami di laboratorio utili all’inquadramento diagnostico e al monitoraggio della patologia in esame, tenendo conto della necessità di ottimizzare le risorse in una logica di appropriatezza prescrittiva. Si insiste sull’assunto che non si intende fornire schemi di valore assoluto ma indicazioni di massima applicabili con competenza clinica nei quadri di presentazione comune, fermo restando che nelle situazioni complesse, atipiche e inusuali il ragionamento clinico deve portare a cercare soluzioni appropriate al caso in oggetto. Considerando che il passaggio logico dai sintomi di presentazione all’ipotesi diagnostica si basa sull’anamnesi accurata, sull’esame obiettivo mirato e sull’inquadramento generale del sintomo nel quadro generale del paziente, la responsabilità del percorso diagnostico iniziale è chiaramente di competenza del Medico di Medicina Generale.


Protocollo Malattie Reumatologiche


Area Tematica : uveiti

Keratoconus / Ectasia Detection with the Oculus Pentacam: Belin / Ambrosio Enhanced Ectasia Display


Keratoconus / Ectasia Detection with the Oculus Pentacam: Belin / Ambrosio Enhanced Ectasia Display


Area Tematica : cornea

ND:YAG-LASER IRIDOTOMY: A LITERATURE REVIEW


ND:YAG-LASER IRIDOTOMY: A LITERATURE REVIEW


Area Tematica : glaucoma

Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

Abstract: Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess.


 The retinal vasculature affords a largescale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pvOCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFPexpressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFPexpressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. 

The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.


Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina


Area Tematica : oct

AngioVue Optovue


AngioVue Optovue


Area Tematica : oct

Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography for choroidal neovascularization after bevacizumab and photodynamic Q3 therapy


Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography for choroidal neovascularization after bevacizumab and photodynamic Q3 therapy


Area Tematica : oct

Wideband Electrically Pumped 1050-nm MEMS-Tunable VCSEL for Ophthalmic Imaging


Wideband Electrically Pumped 1050-nm MEMS-Tunable VCSEL for Ophthalmic Imaging


Area Tematica : oct

Retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging using ultrahigh speed swept source OCT with vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers


Retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging using ultrahigh speed swept source OCT with vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers


Area Tematica : oct

ANGIOVUE OCT-Angiography (OCTA) system


ANGIOVUE OCT-Angiography (OCTA) system


Area Tematica : oct

Swept-Source OCT Angiography: SS OCT AngioTM


Swept-Source OCT Angiography: SS OCT AngioTM


Area Tematica : oct

Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography


Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography


Area Tematica : oct

A Review of Algorithms for Segmentation of Retinal Image Data Using Optical Coherence Tomograph


A Review of Algorithms for Segmentation of Retinal Image Data Using Optical Coherence Tomograph


Area Tematica : oct

Mathematical modeling and glaucoma: the need for an individualized approach to risk assessment


Mathematical modeling and glaucoma: the need for an individualized approach to risk assessment


Area Tematica : glaucoma

Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Vascular Diseases and Choroidal Neovascularization


Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Vascular Diseases and Choroidal Neovascularization


Area Tematica : oct

Combined eye gel containing sodium hyaluronate and xanthan gum for the treatment of the corneal epithelial defect after pterygium surgery


Combined eye gel containing sodium hyaluronate and xanthan gum for the treatment of the corneal epithelial defect after pterygium surgery


Area Tematica : congiuntiva

ARVO 2015 Annual Meeting Abstracts


ARVO 2015 Annual Meeting Abstracts


Area Tematica : oct

Improved microcirculation imaging of human skin in vivo using optical microangiography with a correlation mapping mask


Improved microcirculation imaging of human skin in vivo using optical microangiography with a correlation mapping mask


Area Tematica : oct

Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of vascular abnormalities in the living human eye


Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of vascular abnormalities in the living human eye


Area Tematica : oct

Optimization of the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm on a spectral optical coherence tomography system


Optimization of the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm on a spectral optical coherence tomography system


Area Tematica : oct

Automated choroidal neovascularization detection algorithm for optical coherence tomography angiography


Automated choroidal neovascularization detection algorithm for optical coherence tomography angiography


Area Tematica : oct

Swept-source OCT Angiography of the Retinal Vasculature using Intensity Differentiation Based OMAG Algorithms


Swept-source OCT Angiography of the Retinal Vasculature using Intensity Differentiation Based OMAG Algorithms


Area Tematica : oct
Ricerca Oculisti

Le Interviste per Oftalmologia domani

INTERVISTA CONGRESSO SOI 2016 - DOTT. AMEDEO LUCENTE